Changes

I am refocussing my blogs and I hope you will enjoy the changes!

Suffolk Diary and the London Garden sites are being combined into Enthusiastic Gardener and will be about learning to garden in London and Suffolk, and my enjoyment of plants and gardens which I visit.

Cakes & Baking is where I will develop ideas for a book on cakes.

Londondiaryblog is going to be renamed and will be my explorations in London and abroad – an expat enjoying the richness of the Old World.

And I will play with my growing interest in photography at Pixel Talk, a site as yet very undeveloped.

 

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Kennington Lane, Bradshaw’s Hand Book (No.100)

Bradshaw says ‘..In Kennington Lane is the Licensed Victuallers’ School, and further on is the principal entrance to Vauxhall Gardens, a favourite place of summer resort from the reign of Charles II to that of Victoria..’. Continue reading

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Courtenay Square & surrounds, Bradshaw’s Hand Book (No.99)

Kennington Palace was sited north of Kennington Lane in the Manor of Kennington. ‘Edward III gave the manor of Kennington to his oldest son Edward, the Black Prince in 1337, and the prince then built a large royal palace in the triangle formed by Kennington Lane, Sancroft Street and Cardigan Street, near to Kennington Cross.’ But in 1531 Henry VIII dismantled the building and the materials were used in a new palace in Whitehall.  The Duchy of Cornwall remains a considerable landowner in the area to this day. Continue reading

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Rhododendrons in Greenwich Park

The magnolias are over for another year, but the rhododendrons have started – gorgeous few weeks ahead!

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons

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The Kennington Road, Bradshaw’s Hand Book (No.98)

Bradshaw says ‘..The Kennington Road, leading to Kennington Common and the southern suburbs, is a spacious well-inhabited thoroughfare, with some neat squares and terraces adjoining.’ Today the road is the A23 from Lambeth North Station to the A3 at Kennington Park, a noisy, busy road but those neat squares and terraces can still be found.  Continue reading

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The Westminster Road, Bradshaw’s Hand Book (No.97)

Bradshaw takes me to The Westminster Road which runs from St George’s Circus to Westminster Bridge but only picks out one or two sites. For a full investigation please visit the wonderfully amazing Edith’s Streets and see the posts on St George’s Cathedral and the London Necropolis Railway Station. Continue reading

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Travel in Portugal, Day 9, Belem & The Alfama

This was our last day in Portugal and we only had time for a small taste of Lisbon.Henry the Navigator and his followers are celebrated on the Monument to the Discoveries built in 1958. On the ground in front of the Monument is a Compass Rose, gifted by the South African government in memory of Vasco da Gama, the first to round the Cape of Good Hope.

Monument of the Discoveries

Monument of the Discoveries

The Monument is close to the Tower of Belemand on the Tagus River.

Marina on the Tagus River

Marina on the Tagus River

We drove into Lisbon to park the car, and then walked past the Arco de Rua Augusta into the Alfama District. 

Arch of the Rua Augusta

The Alfama District is the oldest part of Lisbon, between the Tagus River and the Sao Jorge Castle on the top of the hill – and it is a proper hill! This was the Moorish town and it was not destroyed in the earthquake of 1755. The Castle – crowded with tourists and so avoided on this occasion – is Mediaeval and used to be the Royal Palace. A walled town

A view of the Alfama from the Miradoura Santa Luzia

A view of the Alfama from the Miradoura Santa Luzia

Lisbon Cathedral, in the Alfama District

Lisbon Cathedral, in the Alfama District

A final temptation and then it was back to London!

Patisserie in Lisbon

You may be interested in
Self-guided walking tour in the Alfama District
Staying in the Alfama
Visiting the Alfama

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Travel in Portugal, Day 9, Monastery of St Jeronimos

Another extraordinary building – the Monastery of St Jerónimos is a World Heritage Site in the Belém quarter of Lisbon. The buildings were begun in 1501 during the reign of King Manual I (1469-1521) who was also responsible for the Tower of Belém. The King initiated the building in thanks for Vasco da Gama’s successful voyage to India and was built with money gained through the spice trade. The monastery was built on the site of a previous chapel of the Order of Christ which had supported seafarers. King Manual installed monks from the Hieronymite Order (the Order of St Jerome) to occupy the new buildings.

Monastery and Church of St Jeronimos, Lisbon

Monastery and Church of St Jeronimos, Lisbon

Astonishly the buildings survived the earthquake of 1755 with only slight damage but were allowed to decay after the religious orders were dissolved in the 1830s. Restoration began in the 1860s and continued for many years thereafter, and in 1984 it was declared a World Heritage Site.

"Mosteiro dos Jerónimos antes de 1755" by Unknown - "Quadros de antes do Terramoto de 1755 serão expostos ao público em Lisboa" - Público. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mosteiro_dos_Jer%C3%B3nimos_antes_de_1755.png#/media/File:Mosteiro_dos_Jer%C3%B3nimos_antes_de_1755.png

“Mosteiro dos Jerónimos antes de 1755″ by Unknown – “Quadros de antes do Terramoto de 1755 serão expostos ao público em Lisboa” – Público. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org

The Order of the Hieronymites

The Order of the Hieronymites

This ornate door, facing outwards, is not the main door, which is ‘concealed’ inside the building and facing the altar. On our visit it was also ‘concealed’ by tourists and the second photograph is from Wikipedia, as credited.

St Jeronomos Monastery, Lisbon

St Jeronomos Monastery, Lisbon

The Main Door, "Westernportal jeronimosmonastery" by Lijealso - Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Westernportal_jeronimosmonastery.JPG#/media/File:Westernportal_jeronimosmonastery.JPG

“Westernportal jeronimosmonastery” by Lijealso – Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Westernportal_jeronimosmonastery.JPG#/media/File:Westernportal_jeronimosmonastery.JPG

Inside the Church I had a sense of fragility – could that be possible with such a massive stone building? I apologise for the quality of these photographs as I had to rely on the Canon SX240 and edit in Lightroom.

Vasco da Gama's Tomb

Vasco da Gama’s Tomb

Church of St Jeronimos, Lisbon

Church of St Jeronimos, Lisbon

The glory is the cloister, designed by João de Castilho on two levels. The stonework is breathtaking, with many reminders of the sea in rope designs and fantastical sea creatures.

The Cloister, Monastery and Church of St Jeronimos, Lisbon

The Cloister, Monastery and Church of St Jeronimos, Lisbon

The cloister, St Jeronimos, Lisbon

The cloister, St Jeronimos, Lisbon

The cloister, St Jeronimos, Lisbon

 

You may be interested in
St Jeronimos Monastery – interesting photographs

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Travel in Portugal, Day 9, Tower of Belem, Lisbon

The Tower of Belem, looking towards the mouth of the Tagus

The Tower of Belem, looking towards the mouth of the Tagus

The Tower of Belem, close to the shoreline

The Tower of Belem, close to the shoreline

Our final day in Portugal and I wanted a ‘taste’ of Lisbon so we did the obviously touristy things! The Tower of Belem was commissioned by King John I in the late 15C to strengthen the defense system at the mouth of the Tagus River and protect protect Lisbon. It was his successor, King Manual I who completed the project, in 1519. The Tower was built on an outcrop of rock close to the shore the earthquake of 1755 affected the course of the river and the Tower is now almost on the shore. It was named The Tower of St Vincent after the Patron Saint of Lisbon and altered several times during the following years.

The Tower of Belem, looking towards the opposite side of the Tagus

The Tower of Belem, looking towards the opposite side of the Tagus

French ships exchanging fire with the Tower during the Battle of the Tagus, 1831 (Wikipedia)

French ships exchanging fire with the Tower during the Battle of the Tagus, 1831 (Wikipedia)

The Virgin of Belem (aka The Virgin of the Grapes)

The Virgin of Belem (aka The Virgin of the Grapes)

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Travel in Portugal, Day 8, Around Queluz

Continue reading

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