Thames Tour – The Millennium Bridge

Blackfriars Bridge should be our next stop, but since Mr Bradshaw’s time a new bridge has intervened – the Millennium Bridge. 

Millennium & Blackfriars Bridges

Millennium & Blackfriars Bridges

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Thames Tour – Southwark Bridge

The next bridge after London Bridge is the Cannon Street Railway Bridge which was designed by John Hawkshaw and John Wolfe-Barry for the South Eastern Railway and built 1863-66, slightly after Mr Bradshaw’s Guide. Continue reading

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The Tour of The Thames – London Bridge

After savouring the delights of London Mr Bradshaw offers ‘A complete steamboat companion for summer excursions, Hampton Court to the Nore’. Part I is upriver. In 1895 a steamer left London Bridge at 10.00am in the summer, calling at all stops to Hampton Court. I will walk from London Bridge to Westminster and then take a River Boat to Hampton Court, a journey of over 22 miles.

Thames from London Bridge to Hampton Court

Thames from London Bridge to Hampton Court

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Lambeth Palace to Waterloo Station, Bradshaw’s HandBook, no.104

‘…Through Bishop’s Walk, whence across the river an excellent view can be gained of the New Houses of Parliament, and Stangate, a famous spot for boat-builders, we come to the Westminster Bridge Road, at the commencement of which is Astley’s Amphitheatre…’.

Bishops Walk, Lambeth, c.1860 (www.ideal-homes.org.uk)

Bishops Walk, Lambeth, c.1860 (www.ideal-homes.org.uk)

The Houses of Parliament

The Houses of Parliament

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Waterloo Station to London Bridge, Bradshaw’s HandBook, no.105

I last lingered at Waterloo Station, noticing that it is raised above road level. ‘..Indeed,’ says Mr Bradshaw, ‘it hardly needs the occasional incursions of the river to remind the water-side inhabitants that this now dense and widely-spreading region was once a marsh, and even within the recollection of many living, a flat swampy level, scarcely raised above the surface of the Thames…’. The Great Flood of 1928 and then the coastal floods of 1953 finally led to the construction of the Thames Barrier.

Flooding in London, Illustrated London News, 2 Feb.1850 (http://www.victorianlondon.org/weather/floods.htm)

Flooding in London, Illustrated London News, 2 Feb.1850 (http://www.victorianlondon.org/weather/floods.htm)

Men at Lea Bridge during floods of 1928 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-26153241)

Men at Lea Bridge during floods of 1928 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-26153241)

‘..The great timber yards about here are well worth a visit and seem in their colossal piles to threaten exhaustion to the forests of Norway and Sweden.’. Do look at the ordnance survey maps from 1895 – fascinating! Oddly I cannot find any photographs of these timber yards although they are also mentioned here.

Ordnance Survey Map, 1895 (http://maps.nls.uk/view/101201619)

Ordnance Survey Map, 1895 (http://maps.nls.uk/view/101201619)

‘..Stamford Street, or the Commercial Road, leading by the water-side, will bring us to the Blackfriars RoadChrist Church stands partly on the site of Paris Gardens..’

Stamford Street

Stamford Street

Stamford Street is now separated from the river by the embankment – Queen’s Walk, the Coin Street Development, and the Bernie Spain Gardens have replaced the docks. The outline of the docks, adjacent to the old Paris Gardens Manorcan be seen on the ground and a slipway is visible at low tide. Interestingly the London Botanic Garden used to be situated in this area, between Broadwall and Cornwall Road. 

The Embankment opposite Stamford Street

Queen’s Walk – the Embankment opposite Stamford Street

The riverside at Gabriel's Wharf and Bernie Spain Gardens

The riverside at Gabriel’s Wharf and Bernie Spain Gardens

Slipway at Old Barge House Stairs

Slipway at Old Barge House Stairs

‘Continuing our way along the bankside..we come to Barclay & Perkins Brewery, so associated all over the world with the celebrity of London Porter.’ The brewery started in 1616 and was finally closed in 1981 and most of the buildings demolished, but reminders of the past can be found. (Brief history & photographs here, and here.)

Barclays Brewery, 1829 (www.british-history.ac.uk)

Barclays Brewery, 1829 (www.british-history.ac.uk)

The Anchor pub was attached to Barclay & Perkins Brewery

The Anchor pub was attached to Barclay & Perkins Brewery

‘On part of the ground occupied by the adjacent premises stood the Globe Theatre..’. The new Globe Theatre is closer to the Thames than the original building, whose footprint can be seen in Park Street.

The new Globe Theatre

The new Globe Theatre

‘In the bystreets between here and London Bridge some of the walls of Winchester House..are still visible; and the Clink .. still perpetuates its name in one of the adjacent thoroughfares..’.

The Clink Museum in Clink Street

The Clink Museum in Clink Street

The rose window in a remaining wall from Winchester House

The rose window in a remaining wall from Winchester House

‘Hence we cross by the Borough Market back to London Bridge, and so, having effected a complete circuit of the southern portion of the metropolis, return to the point from which we originally started.’

You may be interested in
Old Barge House Stairs & Paris Gardens Manor
Curiosities of London – the Ferryman’s seat at Bankside
Victorian London

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Lambeth Palace & St Mary’s Church, Bradshaw’s HandBook, no.103

The last post promised Lambeth Palace and St Mary’s Church, but I stopped at the gates – now I enter!
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The Royal Doulton Factory in Lambeth

The Royal Doulton Factory building in Lambeth is startling. Now known as Southbank House the building dates from 1876-78, designed by Robert Stark Wilkinson

The Royal Doulton Factory

The Royal Doulton Factory

The tympanum depicts a seated Henry Doulton showing off his wares to potential buyers, with his two leading artists – George Tinworth (middle) and Hannah Bolton Barlow.

The Tinworth Tympanum at the Royal Doulton Factory

The Tinworth Tympanum at the Royal Doulton Factory

Tiles on the Royal Doulton Factory

Tiles on the Royal Doulton Factory

The Royal Doulton Factory

The Royal Doulton Factory

You may be interested in
A detailed article on the building

 

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