Canary Wharf in the mist

2014-12-5 Canary Wharf in the mist LR-2095

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Bradshaw’s Hand Book to London, The South, Guy’s Hospitals (no.81)

‘..Guy’s Hospital, founded by Thomas Guy, a benevolent bookseller in Lombard Street, who, by various successes in trade and speculation succeeded at last in amassing a considerably fortune..’. The hospital was built in 1721, behind St Thomas’ Hospital, and was for the care of incurable patients from St Thomas’s Hospital. The original buildings (dark grey) are at top left of the plan below.

Plan of Guy's Hospital

Plan of Guy’s Hospital

Guy's Hospital, 1840 (Wikipedia)

Guy’s Hospital, 1840 (Wikipedia)

Guy's Hospital today

Guy’s Hospital today

The courtyard inside the main gateway is filled with cars and I couldn’t achieve a convincing photograph. Sir Thomas Guy stands benignly in the middle, and is buried in the Chapel on the west of the square, a beautiful tomb which I felt unable to picture.

Sir Thomas Guy in the Courtyard of Guy's Hospital

Sir Thomas Guy in the Courtyard of Guy’s Hospital

The Chapel, Guy's Hospital

In the Chapel, Guy’s Hospital

Passing through the central gateways leads to The Colonnades and the two small courtyards. Keats, who trained at the Hospital in 1815-16, sits in a stone arbour in the East Courtyard, while a statue of Viscount Nuffielda benefactor of the Hospital, is in the West Courtyard.

Guy's Hospital, Gates to The Colonnades

Guy’s Hospital, Gates to The Colonnades

Behind the entrance courtyard is a quiet area, the Sanctuary, which remembers the ninety four people from the Hospital who were killed in WWII

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IMG_3097Guy’s Hospital continues to grow, with the largest Dental School in Europe and a new Cancer Care block currently under construction.

Thomas Guy was an extraordinary philanthropist. As well as building and endowing the hospital he built almshouses in Tamworth, the town in which he lived as a boy, and he supported many layers of relatives. (The almshouses were rebuilt in 1913.)

Guy's Almshouses, Tamworth (The Staffordshire Views Collection)

Guy’s original Almshouses, Tamworth (The Staffordshire Views Collection)

You may be interested in
A history of the Hospital
Southwark and the Hospitals
Thomas Guy and the Tamworth Almshouses (perhaps not entirely accurate in all details)
Tamworth and its history

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In Greenwich Park

Yesterday was very cold and clear, and the light in the last two hours before sunset was truly golden.

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There was a promise of spring and life to come.

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Bradshaw’s Hand Book to London, The South, St Thomas’ Hospital (no.80)

‘..St Thomas’s Hospital, originally founded as an Almonry in 1213 by the Prior of Bermondsey and opened as an hospital in 1552..’. The hospital was started in association with the Priory of St Mary Overie in 1106 and named after St Thomas à Becket. The Monastery was closed during the Dissolution but the hospital reopened in 1551 through the intervention of the City of London and a Charter from the King, Edward VI, in 1551-52. Continue reading

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Bradshaw’s Hand Book to London, The South, London Bridge Station (no.79)

‘..The spacious terminus of the South Eastern, London and Brighton, Greenwich, North Kent, and Croydon Railways, that all converge at this point, is seen at the end of a broad turning that leads from the main road up to the respective stations.’. Continue reading

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Travel in Spain, Day 10, the last day

A wonderful time in Galicia was over all too quickly. We crossed the bridge into Portugal and headed for Porto Airport, and London.

The iron bridge between Tui and Valencay The motorway to Porto

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Travel in Spain, Monastery of San Clodio

The clouds lifted and after walking around Ribadavia we visited the Monastery of San Clodio before returning to Tui. Some date the monastery to the 6C, others the 10C. Some say it was the Benedictine monks who established the monastery as a prosperous agriculture centre, particularly skilled in wine production; others say it was the Cistercians. Today it is a hotel and when we visited there was no-one in sight!

Monastery-Hotel of San Clodio

Monastery-Hotel of San Clodio

 

Monastery-Hotel of San Clodio

Chapel (through the door) in Monastery-Hotel of San Clodio

 

Monastery-Hotel of San Clodio

Monastery-Hotel of San Clodio

Monastery-Hotel of San Clodio

A short excursion into the hills convinced me I need to return.

The hills above Leira, in Ribeiro wine country

The hills above Leira, in Ribeiro wine country

 

 

You may be interested in
San Clodio and Ribeiro wines

 

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Travel in Spain, Day 9, Ribadavia

A misty start to the second-last day in Spain as we headed for Ribadavia, an old town on the Avia and Minho Rivers with its roots in Celtic and Roman times. Continue reading

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Travel in Spain, Tui Cathedral

As with many religious building, the Cathedral in Tui was built on a site used for Christian worship since 5C. The current building was begun in 12C after waves of invasions by Normans and Saracens in previous centuries, and consecrated in 1225 AD. The building is difficult to see and appreciate, even though it stands on the brow of the hill, and the exterior gives no indication of what lies inside. Continue reading

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Travel in Spain, the town of Tui

Tui was originally a Roman settlement called Tude, perched on top of a hill beside the Minho River and looking to Portugal on the far bank. And it has all the characteristics you would expect to find in an old town – narrow and winding streets, walls, fortifications, and plenty of churches! I should have spent more time wandering about the streets.

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Rua Lorenzo Cuenca, 13C

Rua Lorenzo Cuenca, 13C

The street above led us past the ruins of a prison where old walls were clearly visible. There were apparently two sets of walls: those of the 12C and another set built in the 15C. It was clearly an important town, with impressive mansions and many plaques or coats of arms on the walls.

TheCathedral of Tui is extraordinary and I will post separately, but there were plenty of other churches, convents, and monasteries, of which we only caught a glimpse. The Chapel of St Telmo, built on the site of the house where the saint died in the 13C, is the only example of Portuguese Baroque architecture in Spain.

The Church of San Telmo, Patron Saint of Tui

The Church of San Telmo, Patron Saint of Tui

The Convent of Santa Clara (the Poor Clares) was founded in 1524 and is a closed order. The ‘Tunnel of the Nuns’ was also a gateway into the town in the 12C.

The Church and Convent of Santa Domingo date from 1329 and were originally outside the walls of the town, but later incorporated. Today some of the old wall is alongside the Convent, with a gate. This church was the mausoleum for important families in the town.

The Church of Santa Domingo

The Church of Santo Domingo

The Church of Santa Domingo

The San Domingo Convent

The San Domingo Convent

And finally, a fountain from the 12C

 

 

You may be interested in
Tui and here and here (in translation) and here
A little article about one of the gates – you will need a translator!

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